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Wednesday

Facing the Flood – A Summertime Memory


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Facing the Flood – A Summertime Memory

“Most men pursue pleasure
with such breathless haste
that they hurry past it.”
Danish Philosopher
(1813 - 1855)

Photo c2009 by Nickers and Ink
All rights reserved

Soggy Stuff and Sure Enough –
Limericked Lines for Rain or Shine

Our heirlooms dear twirling the drain,
As clouds may defy weathervane,
We survey the skies,
And still scrutinize.
Oh, when will the rain ever wane?

Our vision is blinded, behold,
As power lines dangle, out cold.
Our home modified,
Dismantled, beside,
By forces beyond our control.

A doll in the downpour may smile;
Assimilation is her style.
The rest of us groan
For all that we own,
Possessions we’ve tried to stockpile.

This baptism banal takes shape,
With every discarded drape.
Ablution evades,
As groundwater raids
Our homestead with no near escape.

Insurance adjusters want blood,
Replacing each stick in the mud.
Most items unpaid
Make memories fade,
Along with the force of the flood.

Yet gratitude comes in a flash,
Considering in the backlash –
We all are unhurt,
Despite damp and dirt
And treasure troves tossed in the trash.

Posted for a variety of prompts:
Catchwords/In other Words (Kierkegaard quote)
Easy Street Prompts (“baptism – absolution - escape”)
Heads or Tails (“summertime memory”)
Mad Kane (Limerick: “Oh, when will the rain ever wane?”)
One Single Impression (“assimilation”)
Pumping Your Muse Prompts (“the doll”)
Simply Snickers (“blind,” “beside” and “bold”)
Sunday Scribblings (“vision”)

Photo prompts:
Odd Shots (photo/s – odd shots)
Scenic Sunday (photo/s)
Sunday Stills (photo/s)
Weekend Snapshot (photo/s)

Love poetry? Check out Simply Snickers and The Meme Express for blogging prompts.



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Friday

Playing House

Playing House


This weekend, our witty friend Galen will hand off his beloved daughter to her fiance in marriage. In a flash, his child will be setting up house with another.


Recognizing this auspicious occasion, today’s Friday Flash-55 is dedicated to the G-man. Congratulations and best wishes!


The Tailor Made Girl

By C. Jay Taylor

1888

Father of the Bride –

A Limericked Pair for a Papa with Flair


The spiffiest papa this hour,

Beholding his lovely young flower.

Adorned all in white,

This beautiful sight,

He wished he could stash in a tower.


But walls wouldn’t hold hands of time,

Not stave off this moment sublime.

With eyes closed, he gasped.

His child’s grip he grasped

And up to the altar did climb.


Posted for a variety of prompts:

Easy Street Prompts (“playing house”)

Fiction Friday (“… closed his eyes, took a deep breath, and jumped.”

Friday Flash-55 (55 words)

Meme Express (Friday Freedom)

Monday Poetry Train (poem/s)

One Single Impression (“walls”)

Theme Thursday (“beautiful”)


Love poetry? Check out Simply Snickers, a brand-new weekly poetry prompt. Try your hand with weekly prompts! Or, look into The Meme Express for daily blogging prompts.


Click here to visit Linda Ann Nickerson’s poetry and humor blog, Nickers and Ink.


Throughout 2009, please join us at The Heart of a Ready Writer, a Bible reading and devotional blog, as we read through the entire Bible in chronological order.


Click here to subscribe to an RSS feed for this writer's helpful Helium content. If you wish, click here for a free subscription to this author's online AC content, so you won't miss a single post!


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Thursday

MAD Glibs – Limericks and Fun

MAD Glibs – Limericks and Fun


My friend Mad Kane has issued several calls for limericks lately. Here’s my attempt to catch up, just for laughs. (The lines in red typeface represent the limerick prompts.)


Emancipated Waitress


There once was a guy with no hair.

Each evening, he played solitaire.

The day finally came

When one pretty dame

Discovered him a millionaire.


Total Denial


A hard-working author named Fink

Once penned a “Dear John” to his shrink.

He ranted and railed.

The missive he mailed,

But wrote with invisible ink.

The Party Line


There once was a government clerk,

Disgruntled with his line of work.

Then he had a fling

With sweet silly string

And drove all his colleagues berserk.


Strappy, but Snappy


A woman was feeling depressed.

She needed not double chin rest.

A surgeon with glee

Took her E to B,

And she got it off of her chest.


The Collector


A fictional writer named Frank

Fell victim to publisher prank.

He offered his tale

‘Mid fresh cakes and ale,

And signed for a royalty blank.


The Other Woman


There once was a nag known as Ag,

A stingy and surly old bag.

But each night she danced,

By suitors entranced,

Thus causing the town tongues to wag.


Taxi Time


A dim-witted driver named Ed,

Whose long locks were braided in dredd,

Did smartly refuse

His real name to use,

Because it nine syllables read.

Posted for a variety of prompts:

Easy Street Prompts “the collector,” “the party line,” “the other woman,” “emancipated waitress,”)

Mad Kane (Limericks: “A woman was feeling depressed,” “There once was a guy with no hair…” “There once was a government clerk…” “A hard-working author named Fink…” or “There once was a nag known as Ag…” or “A dim-witted driver named Ed”)


Love poetry? Check out Simply Snickers, a brand-new weekly poetry prompt. Try your hand with weekly prompts! Or, look into The Meme Express for daily blogging prompts.


Click here to visit Linda Ann Nickerson’s poetry and humor blog, Nickers and Ink.


Throughout 2009, please join us at The Heart of a Ready Writer, a Bible reading and devotional blog, as we read through the entire Bible in chronological order.


Click here to subscribe to an RSS feed for this writer's helpful Helium content. If you wish, click here for a free subscription to this author's online AC content, so you won't miss a single post!


Add to Technorati Favorites

Sunday

Hues – Pick and Choose


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Hues – Pick and Choose

What color is silence?

What shade is solitude? Maybe the moment determines the dye. Perhaps the paint may be altered by attitude. What changes the colors of our moments of quietness? Is it our circumstances, our situations, our attitudes, our distractions or something far greater? Perhaps we need to pause, every once in a while and ponder the question.

What color is silence?

The Hammock
By Gustave Courbet
1844

The Color of Silence
Acrostic in Rhyme on a Rainbow of Mime

The color of silence may vary a lot,
His palette may change in a single sole spot.
Each tinge tainted only by matters of thought.

Consider an unspoken season of red,
Outshone only by a fierce tempered hothead.
Look further to find undercurrents of blue,
Of deepest dark ponderings, dyeing right through.
Reflect on the tints a grief proving true.

Oh, look! A green envious streak takes up haunt.
Forget not the force of an unspoken want.

Still, solace may settle in shadows of fear,
Installing a yellowish shade coming clear.
Look up, and you’ll notice a color alone,
Enticing to solitude, painting in stone.
No mystic salute, as it beckons us swing.
Check off-color comments outside of these walls;
Each hue, though absurd, simply shines as it calls.

Posted for a variety of prompts:
Acrostics Only (“the color of silence”)
Meme Express (Sunday invitation to Simply Snickers)
One Single Impression (“walls”)
Simply Snickers (“salute,” “stone” and “swing’)
Sunday Scribblings (“absurd”)

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