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Monday

I is for It Is a Beauteous Evening


What is more peaceful than a striking evening sunset scene with time to observe and ponder?

William Wordsmith (1770-1850) was a British Romantic poet. His most momentous work was likely The Prelude, published posthumously and perhaps dedicated to fellow poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Among my favorite Wordsmith works, however, has always been this treasured one. Maybe it’s the last line. Or perhaps it’s simply that I’ve strolled through scenes such as Wordsmith described in these verses.


It Is a Beauteous Evening, by William Wordsmith

It is a beauteous evening, calm and free,
The holy time is quiet as a nun
Breathless with adoration; the broad sun
Is sinking down in its tranquility;

The gentleness of heaven broods o'er the sea:
Listen! the mighty Being is awake,
And doth with his eternal motion make
A sound like thunder - everlastingly.

Dear Child! dear Girl! that walkest with me here,
If thou appear untouched by solemn thought,
Thy nature is not therefore less divine:
Thou liest in Abraham's bosom all the year,
And worship'st at the Temple's inner shrine,
God being with thee when we know it not.

Last year’s A to Z post: Idols and Icons

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Image/s:
Lake Sunset – original photography
Copyrighted by Linda Ann Nickerson – Nickers and Ink
A to Z Blogging Challenge 2012 logo
Fair Use
Favorite Classic Poems
Adapted from ClipArt ETC

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5 comments:

  1. Beautiful words. Somehow the meaning is hidden unless you tease it out.

    Http://francene-wordstitcher.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sorry. I left an incorrect link to my side. I'd better say something else about Wordsworth to make this a legitimate comment. I guess back in the days of old, there weren't so many poets vying for publication, which gave him free range.

    http://francene-wordstitcher.blogspot.co.uk

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love WOrdsworth and all the old English poets. They did know how to string words together to create great poetry:)

    Nutschell
    www.thewritingnut.com

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi…I’m hopping over from the A to Z Challenge. Lovely post…good luck with the challenge.

    Donna L Martin
    http://www.donasdays.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. How lovely! Wish I was better with poetry, both at writing it and understanding it.

    It's nice to meet you. I'm a new follower via the A to Z.

    ReplyDelete

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